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How to Make a Homemade Reusable Ice Pack

When you have an acute injury or are recovering from surgery, it is often recommended that you apply ice to help control swelling, inflammation and pain to the affected area.  Rest, Ice, Compression and Elevation can all help control what occurs at the injured site.  The body’s first response is to send a lot of blood and fluid to the injured area to clean it up and prepare the tissue for healing.  It is normal to feel pain and stiffness in the acute phase of healing.  Using an ice pack helps by causing vasoconstriction or a closing down of blood vessels to limit the amount of swelling that tends to limit motion at the injured site.  Application of cold will also reduce pain.  Some people try to use ice in a bag but ice cubes eventually melt and if you place just water in a bag in the freezer, you will end up with just a chunk of ice that is not able to contour around a body part easily.  When using ice, always have a towel or pillowcase between your skin and the cold pack.  Cold treatment is usually used for 10-15 minutes at time. Here is a recipe for how to make a reusable homemade ice pack that will chill up more like an ice/slushy bag that will contour around your sore body part and can be placed back into your freezer to “reslush” up again for the next use! Put ½ bottle of isopropyl (rubbing) alcohol in a medium sized Ziploc baggie and add water until the bag is about 2/3 full.  Seal the baggie, removing...

Exercise in Disguise

Do you exercise? When most individuals in the United States think of exercise, they think structured exercise perhaps of a gym environment with machines or a structured class of aerobics or Zumba or yoga. The fitness industry can offer a variety of ways to put in some body work. Exercise is important to keeping our heart and cardiovascular system healthy, keeping us strong by building muscle and helping us have energy for our daily lives. We in the US tend to live sedentary yet stressful lives. Sitting is now the new smoking. Most people complain that they do not have the time or money for structured exercise. This blog is to encourage the people who do not have the time or money to dedicate to structured fitness. There are many things you can still squeeze in, disguise into your daily life that can fit some fitness into your daily life. First of all, you have to embrace the value of some type of physical activity as a way to get more fitness into your life. Commit to just adding more standing and more movement to things you have to do every day. If you have a desk job, see if you can get an adjustable standing desk which would allow you to stand for part of the day as you work on the computer or complete tasks. If that is not possible, bring a new photo or memento to work to put on your desk. Every time you notice your new piece of desk décor, let it remind you to do a few backward shoulder rolls or shoulder blade...

What is your Risk level for experiencing a Fall? Take this short Quiz Then read how to prevent falls in your life.

Ask these questions to yourself or to someone you care about: Are you over the age of 65? Are you female? Do you take 4 or more prescription drugs a day?  Are any of these medications of the following types:  diuretic, high blood pressure medication, antidepressants, sedatives? Do you drink alcohol? Do you have trouble seeing? Do you have foot disorders? Do you ever get postural hypotension? Do you have trouble hearing? Do you have a physical limitation that prevents you from moving well? Each yes to a question posed above is a yes to the fact that you have that risk factor that makes you more prone to falling.  Here are some facts about falls and how physical therapy here at Optimal Physical Therapy and Sports Performance can help you if you are concerned about falls or have fallen with or without injury. It is a known fact in the United States that every year, 1 out of every 3 persons who are 65 years or older will experience a fall.  50% of those who fall will fall repeatedly.  90% of all hip fractures are a result of a fall.  Falls are the sixth leading cause of death of those 65 or older and cause more deaths than either pneumonia or diabetes.  20% of hip fractures result in death within a year of fracture.  Women are three times more likely than men to be hospitalized for fall related injuries.  Younger senior women are actually more at risk than older senior women most likely due to the fact that they walk faster and have less time to recover from...

Physical Therapists stand at the ready to help with the Opioid Crisis

Physical Therapists stand at the ready to help with the Opioid Crisis   Did you know that Physical Therapy is a profession that was actually birthed out of national crisis situations?  In 1917, the US War department’s surgeon general saw the great need for a special group of people who could intervene to help injured soldiers during World War I.  His attention was drawn to England where education was being given to young women in teaching them how to help with the traumatic injuries of war.  The United States sent a young woman, Mary McMillan, to receive this education and to return and begin a program here in the US.  She became the first “physical therapist” in the United States. The early physical therapists were called Reconstruction Aides.  86,000 soldiers were treated from 1918-1920.  Proving that many men could be returned to useful lives avoiding serious disability, the principles of physical therapy became so definitively established that civilian hospitals began to provide a staff of such workers.   The field continued to grow even more after World War II.  The national crisis of the Polio Epidemic also found the US medical system in need of skilled individuals to address the physical needs of children and adults recovering from polio.   Dr Robert Lovett, an orthopedic surgeon dealing with the aftermath of polio conceptualized the “team approach” to rehabilitation for polio and he united doctors, nurses, physical therapists and brace makers to work together  to help address the polio epidemic. Today, physical therapy has evolved into a healthcare profession that requires a doctoral level of education and can address individuals with catastrophic...

ErgoMOMics Part 1

ErgoMOMics: Part 1 This blog is being dedicated to all the busy moms out there trying to work, run a household, raise children and take care of themselves. Moms put themselves last so they are often experiencing physical issues that they have no time to address.  The idea of “just put yourself first” or “carve out some time for yourself” makes sense literally but in real life, it rarely happens for most moms.  There is a field of study called Ergonomics where scientists study work tasks and how the body can do these tasks most efficiently without body harm and offers suggestions on how to modify a work location such as an office desk, assembly line or a lift/carry job. Moms have multiple job descriptions: household management: cleaning, budgeting, shopping including loading/unloading groceries, laundry, cooking, and dressing/bathing children.  They are transporters to sports practice and dance classes.  Most moms feel like the ringmaster of a three ring circus.  Mom’s job never stops and it is as busy as it will get when you have infant/small children at home or in grade school. So, here is part one of a series of suggestions to help you as you handle your own personal three ring circus.  These are a few suggestions to help you avoid the physical wear and tear of motherhood:   Laundry: Carry balanced loads. Consider using smaller baskets versus one big one that can become too heavy.  If you are a side hip carrier of baskets, alternate sides so that your body does not get molded into carrying repetitive loads just on one side.  Slide the basket down the...