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Do Compression Tights Help Runner’s Speed or Distance?

Researchers from The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Science Daily investigated if compression tights improve runners’ speed or distance compared to when they did not wear them.  The theory is that muscles vibrate while people run and this causes muscle contractions which use energy.  The researchers’ theory was that the use of compression tights during running should reduce the muscle’s  vibration and therefore result in less fatigue for the runner.  Fatigue is a concern because a fatigued runner may alter their running form and put more strain on their joints causing overuse injuries. Participants ran for 30 minutes at 80% of the maximum speed on 2 different days using a treadmill.  On one day, they wore compression tights and on the other, they did not.  The runners’ leg strength and jump height were tested prior to and after each run.  Heart monitors were worn by the runners to measure their exertion during the test.  Force sensors in the treadmill deck measured foot contact forces and motion sensors captured joint angles to see if they changed over time or between runs. The researchers concluded “experienced runners had no more strain on their joints at the end of a training run than at the beginning” with or without tights.  They also found “the reduced vibration” in the muscles with the tights did not result in any reduction in fatigue.   Nothing in the study showed that it is bad to wear compression tights.  They commented “every little bit of perception counts when running long distances, so the tights may help runners in ways we are not yet able to measure”.  Future...

The Cultural Trend of Sports Specialization in Youth: What You Should Know

The Cultural Trend of Sports Specialization in Youth:  What You Should Know   There is no doubt that organized sports can be a very positive experience for young people offering fitness benefits (greater cardiovascular health, bone mass, strength, prevention of obesity and type II diabetes), improved coordination and athletic skills, self esteem and social interaction skills in addition to just being a healthy outlet for fun!  Youth participation in sports has changed dramatically in the past 3 decades.  Participation has increased by more than sixfold.  Girls have become more involved in athletics and there has been significant study of the female athlete’s vulnerability to specific injuries.   Including both genders between the ages of 5 and 14, sports related injuries have increased to estimated numbers of 3.5 million a year.  Within this great increase of participation in youth sports, has grown a trend of “sports specialization” occurring in younger and younger age groups.  This phenomenon is when young athletes “self select” to focus on a year round single sport participation.  Children and adolescents who choose one specific sport face increasing quantity and specificity of stresses on their growing bodies due to the constant exposure of that one sport or training required for that one sport.  As professionals in the medical field and specialists in the sports medicine arena, we are noting that we have within our community two large populations of children:  Ones who are inactive and face the threat of obesity and another growing large group of increasingly specializing sport youth who are at risk of developing injury due to overuse in a skeletally immature body.  Did you know...